Fursa Sa'ida فرصة سعيدة

Literally "Happy chance," but it means "Nice to meet you" in Arabic. (I chose the name when I was living in Egypt.)

If you're looking for substance, there's a handy link called "Analysis" right down below, which I invite you to check out. The rest is shorter thoughts, humor, caps lock, and the occasional personal post. Ask me anything you like.

FYI, I co-blog a lot of pop culture, fangirly things with my dear CT over at 22drunkb. If you enjoy hilarity and flailing, head that way. ________

Tagged google:

owlmylove:

breefolk:

mama-connor:

Wow Google, thank you for the stunning support! The effort you put into representing this cause is fantastic! Like, wow, this doesn’t even compare to what you did for the DW 50th!

Word.

I understand that visibility is most certainly important for a cause, and that this is no exception- but as a girl who just got out of abusive household last year, I believe I understand why Google’s support is so discreet. It’s the same reason why the abusive relationship website “When Georgia Smiled" has an escape button that wipes all traces of the website. Hundreds of abusers are instantly inflamed by any sort of media that might imply that what they’re doing is wrong and that their victims might need help.

And while I think we’d all like more media attention towards the consequences of violent assaults against women, what we need to keep in mind is that those with abusive nature (even if they’re not currently in a relationship) could be easily angered by a colorful banner that “shames them”, and might endanger the women around them. I’ll be the last person to imply that violence against women doesn’t need more coverage- but not all causes are so easily assisted by a media blitz.

Dec 14
owlmylove:

breefolk:

mama-connor:

Wow Google, thank you for the stunning support! The effort you put into representing this cause is fantastic! Like, wow, this doesn’t even compare to what you did for the DW 50th!

Word.

I understand that visibility is most certainly important for a cause, and that this is no exception- but as a girl who just got out of abusive household last year, I believe I understand why Google’s support is so discreet. It’s the same reason why the abusive relationship website “When Georgia Smiled" has an escape button that wipes all traces of the website. Hundreds of abusers are instantly inflamed by any sort of media that might imply that what they’re doing is wrong and that their victims might need help.
And while I think we’d all like more media attention towards the consequences of violent assaults against women, what we need to keep in mind is that those with abusive nature (even if they’re not currently in a relationship) could be easily angered by a colorful banner that “shames them”, and might endanger the women around them. I’ll be the last person to imply that violence against women doesn’t need more coverage- but not all causes are so easily assisted by a media blitz.

theatlantic:

The Google County Times: The Future of Local News?

Google has hatched a plan to boost the visibility of its existing local news product, and in the process is testing a whole new way to get people to pay attention to the news that is geographically most relevant to them.

Google is testing a local news “card” in its Google Now service, which is built into all new Android smartphones and is available on the iPhone through Google’s Search app. Google Now is a logical vehicle for local news because one of its primary functions is knowing where you are and providing information that is “contextually relevant" to you, as specified by your interests, the time of day, and your location.

This beta test has not been previously disclosed, and is currently being carried out solely within Google itself, but its existence was revealed to me last week in an interview with Johanna Wright, vice president of search and assist at Google.

Read more. [Image: Darryl Dyck/AP]

THE SAGA OF ME NOPE-ING THE FUCK OUT CONTINUES

Putting local news in context could make it relevant in a way that simply dumping it on a site that people have to remember to go to might never. It transforms local news into a push medium, since Google Now is constantly deciding which cards to preemptively display to people, in a process known internally on the Google Now team as “triggering.”

Google News is run by algorithms, but even algorithms have the editorial priorities of their creators built into them. Does this mean Google Now is about to become an expression of Google’s increasing civic-mindedness, alerting us to the same kinds of important (but easily overlooked) local news about courts, politics and ordinances that regional newspapers once covered? That depends entirely on whether the local news sites from which Google News draws its content continue to cover those issues—but at least now, they could have more visibility.

1. The “triggering” thing a) is just a really unfortunate choice of term but also b) reflects my whole giant problem with behavioral economics. Rather than using the influx of psychological and behavioral data to humanize and expand the reach of economic analysis, to get away from the mechanical nature of it, these techniques are used as another form of control, another way to see people as machines who can be manipulated by pulling the right levers. (I’m not saying people don’t generally respond in predictable ways to particular stimuli; we do. But that shouldn’t be the basis of how we look at ourselves and how we try to create and reshape our world.) What could be part of a shift toward a less predatory and unsympathetic system is instead used to support the existing capitalist and social structure. This is a minor, apparently benign version of it, but it still wigs me out.

2. We already know that our governments have influence over major tech companies in terms of the use and sharing of data. Who’s to say they won’t be able to influence which news gets displayed to a user? The insidiousness of a service like this is that it gives the consumer the suggestion that they now know everything. It discourages you from looking further or digging deeper. If a given story is omitted, most likely people will never go looking for anything they might have missed, and so the concealment of it is basically accomplished simply by omission.

Aug 02
theatlantic:

The Google County Times: The Future of Local News?

Google has hatched a plan to boost the visibility of its existing local news product, and in the process is testing a whole new way to get people to pay attention to the news that is geographically most relevant to them.
Google is testing a local news “card” in its Google Now service, which is built into all new Android smartphones and is available on the iPhone through Google’s Search app. Google Now is a logical vehicle for local news because one of its primary functions is knowing where you are and providing information that is “contextually relevant" to you, as specified by your interests, the time of day, and your location.
This beta test has not been previously disclosed, and is currently being carried out solely within Google itself, but its existence was revealed to me last week in an interview with Johanna Wright, vice president of search and assist at Google.
Read more. [Image: Darryl Dyck/AP]


THE SAGA OF ME NOPE-ING THE FUCK OUT CONTINUES

Putting local news in context could make it relevant in a way that simply dumping it on a site that people have to remember to go to might never. It transforms local news into a push medium, since Google Now is constantly deciding which cards to preemptively display to people, in a process known internally on the Google Now team as “triggering.”
Google News is run by algorithms, but even algorithms have the editorial priorities of their creators built into them. Does this mean Google Now is about to become an expression of Google’s increasing civic-mindedness, alerting us to the same kinds of important (but easily overlooked) local news about courts, politics and ordinances that regional newspapers once covered? That depends entirely on whether the local news sites from which Google News draws its content continue to cover those issues—but at least now, they could have more visibility.

1. The “triggering” thing a) is just a really unfortunate choice of term but also b) reflects my whole giant problem with behavioral economics. Rather than using the influx of psychological and behavioral data to humanize and expand the reach of economic analysis, to get away from the mechanical nature of it, these techniques are used as another form of control, another way to see people as machines who can be manipulated by pulling the right levers. (I’m not saying people don’t generally respond in predictable ways to particular stimuli; we do. But that shouldn’t be the basis of how we look at ourselves and how we try to create and reshape our world.) What could be part of a shift toward a less predatory and unsympathetic system is instead used to support the existing capitalist and social structure. This is a minor, apparently benign version of it, but it still wigs me out.
2. We already know that our governments have influence over major tech companies in terms of the use and sharing of data. Who’s to say they won’t be able to influence which news gets displayed to a user? The insidiousness of a service like this is that it gives the consumer the suggestion that they now know everything. It discourages you from looking further or digging deeper. If a given story is omitted, most likely people will never go looking for anything they might have missed, and so the concealment of it is basically accomplished simply by omission.

mahiyesiyah:

mariodelmonaco:

lutheranroseandheart:

The epitome of American progressivism: snubbing 2.2 billion human beings, a third of the planet’s population, on their most major holiday, to remember a guy’s birthday that isn’t even a round number.

The epitome of Christian entitlement. Many of the country’s stores are closed for Easter, the news covers Easter events, Easter specials are being played on TV, many schools are going to be closed for Spring break the week after Easter. But ONE MEASLY website decides to celebrate the birthday of a man that was very important in this nation’s history instead, and some of you are butt hurt about it????

Christian tears

I’m picturing people wandering the candy aisle at CVS, weeping Christian tears and trying to comfort the plastic eggs.

Apr 01
mahiyesiyah:

mariodelmonaco:

lutheranroseandheart:

The epitome of American progressivism: snubbing 2.2 billion human beings, a third of the planet’s population, on their most major holiday, to remember a guy’s birthday that isn’t even a round number.

The epitome of Christian entitlement. Many of the country’s stores are closed for Easter, the news covers Easter events, Easter specials are being played on TV, many schools are going to be closed for Spring break the week after Easter. But ONE MEASLY website decides to celebrate the birthday of a man that was very important in this nation’s history instead, and some of you are butt hurt about it????

Christian tears

I’m picturing people wandering the candy aisle at CVS, weeping Christian tears and trying to comfort the plastic eggs.

aetherodactyl:

My fellow Americans, come November we must choose to elect either a gay cactus or a lying unicorn.

Oh and both of them are the antichrist.

Jul 28
owlmylove:

breefolk:

mama-connor:

Wow Google, thank you for the stunning support! The effort you put into representing this cause is fantastic! Like, wow, this doesn’t even compare to what you did for the DW 50th!

Word.

I understand that visibility is most certainly important for a cause, and that this is no exception- but as a girl who just got out of abusive household last year, I believe I understand why Google’s support is so discreet. It’s the same reason why the abusive relationship website “When Georgia Smiled" has an escape button that wipes all traces of the website. Hundreds of abusers are instantly inflamed by any sort of media that might imply that what they’re doing is wrong and that their victims might need help.
And while I think we’d all like more media attention towards the consequences of violent assaults against women, what we need to keep in mind is that those with abusive nature (even if they’re not currently in a relationship) could be easily angered by a colorful banner that “shames them”, and might endanger the women around them. I’ll be the last person to imply that violence against women doesn’t need more coverage- but not all causes are so easily assisted by a media blitz.
owlmylove:

breefolk:

mama-connor:

Wow Google, thank you for the stunning support! The effort you put into representing this cause is fantastic! Like, wow, this doesn’t even compare to what you did for the DW 50th!

Word.

I understand that visibility is most certainly important for a cause, and that this is no exception- but as a girl who just got out of abusive household last year, I believe I understand why Google’s support is so discreet. It’s the same reason why the abusive relationship website “When Georgia Smiled" has an escape button that wipes all traces of the website. Hundreds of abusers are instantly inflamed by any sort of media that might imply that what they’re doing is wrong and that their victims might need help.
And while I think we’d all like more media attention towards the consequences of violent assaults against women, what we need to keep in mind is that those with abusive nature (even if they’re not currently in a relationship) could be easily angered by a colorful banner that “shames them”, and might endanger the women around them. I’ll be the last person to imply that violence against women doesn’t need more coverage- but not all causes are so easily assisted by a media blitz.

owlmylove:

breefolk:

mama-connor:

Wow Google, thank you for the stunning support! The effort you put into representing this cause is fantastic! Like, wow, this doesn’t even compare to what you did for the DW 50th!

Word.

I understand that visibility is most certainly important for a cause, and that this is no exception- but as a girl who just got out of abusive household last year, I believe I understand why Google’s support is so discreet. It’s the same reason why the abusive relationship website “When Georgia Smiled" has an escape button that wipes all traces of the website. Hundreds of abusers are instantly inflamed by any sort of media that might imply that what they’re doing is wrong and that their victims might need help.

And while I think we’d all like more media attention towards the consequences of violent assaults against women, what we need to keep in mind is that those with abusive nature (even if they’re not currently in a relationship) could be easily angered by a colorful banner that “shames them”, and might endanger the women around them. I’ll be the last person to imply that violence against women doesn’t need more coverage- but not all causes are so easily assisted by a media blitz.

theatlantic:

The Google County Times: The Future of Local News?

Google has hatched a plan to boost the visibility of its existing local news product, and in the process is testing a whole new way to get people to pay attention to the news that is geographically most relevant to them.
Google is testing a local news “card” in its Google Now service, which is built into all new Android smartphones and is available on the iPhone through Google’s Search app. Google Now is a logical vehicle for local news because one of its primary functions is knowing where you are and providing information that is “contextually relevant" to you, as specified by your interests, the time of day, and your location.
This beta test has not been previously disclosed, and is currently being carried out solely within Google itself, but its existence was revealed to me last week in an interview with Johanna Wright, vice president of search and assist at Google.
Read more. [Image: Darryl Dyck/AP]


THE SAGA OF ME NOPE-ING THE FUCK OUT CONTINUES

Putting local news in context could make it relevant in a way that simply dumping it on a site that people have to remember to go to might never. It transforms local news into a push medium, since Google Now is constantly deciding which cards to preemptively display to people, in a process known internally on the Google Now team as “triggering.”
Google News is run by algorithms, but even algorithms have the editorial priorities of their creators built into them. Does this mean Google Now is about to become an expression of Google’s increasing civic-mindedness, alerting us to the same kinds of important (but easily overlooked) local news about courts, politics and ordinances that regional newspapers once covered? That depends entirely on whether the local news sites from which Google News draws its content continue to cover those issues—but at least now, they could have more visibility.

1. The “triggering” thing a) is just a really unfortunate choice of term but also b) reflects my whole giant problem with behavioral economics. Rather than using the influx of psychological and behavioral data to humanize and expand the reach of economic analysis, to get away from the mechanical nature of it, these techniques are used as another form of control, another way to see people as machines who can be manipulated by pulling the right levers. (I’m not saying people don’t generally respond in predictable ways to particular stimuli; we do. But that shouldn’t be the basis of how we look at ourselves and how we try to create and reshape our world.) What could be part of a shift toward a less predatory and unsympathetic system is instead used to support the existing capitalist and social structure. This is a minor, apparently benign version of it, but it still wigs me out.
2. We already know that our governments have influence over major tech companies in terms of the use and sharing of data. Who’s to say they won’t be able to influence which news gets displayed to a user? The insidiousness of a service like this is that it gives the consumer the suggestion that they now know everything. It discourages you from looking further or digging deeper. If a given story is omitted, most likely people will never go looking for anything they might have missed, and so the concealment of it is basically accomplished simply by omission.
theatlantic:

The Google County Times: The Future of Local News?

Google has hatched a plan to boost the visibility of its existing local news product, and in the process is testing a whole new way to get people to pay attention to the news that is geographically most relevant to them.
Google is testing a local news “card” in its Google Now service, which is built into all new Android smartphones and is available on the iPhone through Google’s Search app. Google Now is a logical vehicle for local news because one of its primary functions is knowing where you are and providing information that is “contextually relevant" to you, as specified by your interests, the time of day, and your location.
This beta test has not been previously disclosed, and is currently being carried out solely within Google itself, but its existence was revealed to me last week in an interview with Johanna Wright, vice president of search and assist at Google.
Read more. [Image: Darryl Dyck/AP]


THE SAGA OF ME NOPE-ING THE FUCK OUT CONTINUES

Putting local news in context could make it relevant in a way that simply dumping it on a site that people have to remember to go to might never. It transforms local news into a push medium, since Google Now is constantly deciding which cards to preemptively display to people, in a process known internally on the Google Now team as “triggering.”
Google News is run by algorithms, but even algorithms have the editorial priorities of their creators built into them. Does this mean Google Now is about to become an expression of Google’s increasing civic-mindedness, alerting us to the same kinds of important (but easily overlooked) local news about courts, politics and ordinances that regional newspapers once covered? That depends entirely on whether the local news sites from which Google News draws its content continue to cover those issues—but at least now, they could have more visibility.

1. The “triggering” thing a) is just a really unfortunate choice of term but also b) reflects my whole giant problem with behavioral economics. Rather than using the influx of psychological and behavioral data to humanize and expand the reach of economic analysis, to get away from the mechanical nature of it, these techniques are used as another form of control, another way to see people as machines who can be manipulated by pulling the right levers. (I’m not saying people don’t generally respond in predictable ways to particular stimuli; we do. But that shouldn’t be the basis of how we look at ourselves and how we try to create and reshape our world.) What could be part of a shift toward a less predatory and unsympathetic system is instead used to support the existing capitalist and social structure. This is a minor, apparently benign version of it, but it still wigs me out.
2. We already know that our governments have influence over major tech companies in terms of the use and sharing of data. Who’s to say they won’t be able to influence which news gets displayed to a user? The insidiousness of a service like this is that it gives the consumer the suggestion that they now know everything. It discourages you from looking further or digging deeper. If a given story is omitted, most likely people will never go looking for anything they might have missed, and so the concealment of it is basically accomplished simply by omission.

theatlantic:

The Google County Times: The Future of Local News?

Google has hatched a plan to boost the visibility of its existing local news product, and in the process is testing a whole new way to get people to pay attention to the news that is geographically most relevant to them.

Google is testing a local news “card” in its Google Now service, which is built into all new Android smartphones and is available on the iPhone through Google’s Search app. Google Now is a logical vehicle for local news because one of its primary functions is knowing where you are and providing information that is “contextually relevant" to you, as specified by your interests, the time of day, and your location.

This beta test has not been previously disclosed, and is currently being carried out solely within Google itself, but its existence was revealed to me last week in an interview with Johanna Wright, vice president of search and assist at Google.

Read more. [Image: Darryl Dyck/AP]

THE SAGA OF ME NOPE-ING THE FUCK OUT CONTINUES

Putting local news in context could make it relevant in a way that simply dumping it on a site that people have to remember to go to might never. It transforms local news into a push medium, since Google Now is constantly deciding which cards to preemptively display to people, in a process known internally on the Google Now team as “triggering.”

Google News is run by algorithms, but even algorithms have the editorial priorities of their creators built into them. Does this mean Google Now is about to become an expression of Google’s increasing civic-mindedness, alerting us to the same kinds of important (but easily overlooked) local news about courts, politics and ordinances that regional newspapers once covered? That depends entirely on whether the local news sites from which Google News draws its content continue to cover those issues—but at least now, they could have more visibility.

1. The “triggering” thing a) is just a really unfortunate choice of term but also b) reflects my whole giant problem with behavioral economics. Rather than using the influx of psychological and behavioral data to humanize and expand the reach of economic analysis, to get away from the mechanical nature of it, these techniques are used as another form of control, another way to see people as machines who can be manipulated by pulling the right levers. (I’m not saying people don’t generally respond in predictable ways to particular stimuli; we do. But that shouldn’t be the basis of how we look at ourselves and how we try to create and reshape our world.) What could be part of a shift toward a less predatory and unsympathetic system is instead used to support the existing capitalist and social structure. This is a minor, apparently benign version of it, but it still wigs me out.

2. We already know that our governments have influence over major tech companies in terms of the use and sharing of data. Who’s to say they won’t be able to influence which news gets displayed to a user? The insidiousness of a service like this is that it gives the consumer the suggestion that they now know everything. It discourages you from looking further or digging deeper. If a given story is omitted, most likely people will never go looking for anything they might have missed, and so the concealment of it is basically accomplished simply by omission.

mahiyesiyah:

mariodelmonaco:

lutheranroseandheart:

The epitome of American progressivism: snubbing 2.2 billion human beings, a third of the planet’s population, on their most major holiday, to remember a guy’s birthday that isn’t even a round number.

The epitome of Christian entitlement. Many of the country’s stores are closed for Easter, the news covers Easter events, Easter specials are being played on TV, many schools are going to be closed for Spring break the week after Easter. But ONE MEASLY website decides to celebrate the birthday of a man that was very important in this nation’s history instead, and some of you are butt hurt about it????

Christian tears

I’m picturing people wandering the candy aisle at CVS, weeping Christian tears and trying to comfort the plastic eggs.
mahiyesiyah:

mariodelmonaco:

lutheranroseandheart:

The epitome of American progressivism: snubbing 2.2 billion human beings, a third of the planet’s population, on their most major holiday, to remember a guy’s birthday that isn’t even a round number.

The epitome of Christian entitlement. Many of the country’s stores are closed for Easter, the news covers Easter events, Easter specials are being played on TV, many schools are going to be closed for Spring break the week after Easter. But ONE MEASLY website decides to celebrate the birthday of a man that was very important in this nation’s history instead, and some of you are butt hurt about it????

Christian tears

I’m picturing people wandering the candy aisle at CVS, weeping Christian tears and trying to comfort the plastic eggs.

mahiyesiyah:

mariodelmonaco:

lutheranroseandheart:

The epitome of American progressivism: snubbing 2.2 billion human beings, a third of the planet’s population, on their most major holiday, to remember a guy’s birthday that isn’t even a round number.

The epitome of Christian entitlement. Many of the country’s stores are closed for Easter, the news covers Easter events, Easter specials are being played on TV, many schools are going to be closed for Spring break the week after Easter. But ONE MEASLY website decides to celebrate the birthday of a man that was very important in this nation’s history instead, and some of you are butt hurt about it????

Christian tears

I’m picturing people wandering the candy aisle at CVS, weeping Christian tears and trying to comfort the plastic eggs.

Fursa Sa'ida فرصة سعيدة

Posted on Tuesday September 11th 2012 at 12:25pm. Its tags are listed below.

Very Serious Responses To Unintelligent Insults: BiNet USA Wins Over Google in Search Term Dispute

bialogue-group:

After a campaign by BiNet USA and bisexuals worldwide, Google has removed “bisexual” from its list of banned words.

Los Angeles CA 4 September 2012 - BiNet USA is pleased to confirm that Google Inc. has unblocked the term bisexual from its search…

WAITWAITWAITWAITWAIT. Google had “bisexual” on its list of banned terms? They HAVE a list of terms that get no love from the search engine? AND BISEXUAL WAS ON IT? WHAT THE FUCK?!

I’d also be outraged that my Kindle didn’t have it, but I had to teach it plain old “sexual” yesterday, no I guess it’s just a naif all round.

aetherodactyl:

My fellow Americans, come November we must choose to elect either a gay cactus or a lying unicorn.

Oh and both of them are the antichrist.